Homebrew Recipe: Prohibit This! Cream Ale

So a few weeks back we finished up our story behind the American Lager. So it seemed only right and appropriate (appropriate and right) to share our recipe for the Prohibit This! Cream Ale Wait, I hear you say, that piece was on the American Lager. WTF is a cream ale? Well, remember how, in the 1800’s lager beers started becoming popular in a big, bad way?  This shift in popularity made ale producers drop…

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Oktoberfest!

We are coming into my favorite time of the beer calendar. The long, hot summer has ended, giving way to cool, crisp nights and with it a veritable parade of seasonal styles. The first among them: Oktoberfest! What Is Oktoberfest? Well it’s a party. And a beer. And a beer you drink at a party. And a beer that is kinda associate with the party… listen, it’s a whole bunch of things. More than anything…

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Extract VS All Grain

So a few weeks back, I laid out the basic procedure for brewing a batch of beer using malt extracts.  And in the coming weeks I will start talking about moving to All Grain. But you might be asking yourself.  Wait, what exactly is the difference?  What is Extract?  What is All Grain?  What is LIFE?! WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN??! Okay well, calm down there, Existential Crisis Man, I’ll Explain What does it all…

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Your First Brew Part 3: The Bottling

Okay, it’s been two weeks. You’ve been watching the airlock on your bucket or carboy bubbling away with a certain hunger in your eye and an anticipation in your liver. You’ve been marking your calendar every day waiting for the moment when the beer is finally done and you can sample the goodness that barley hops and yeast making sweet love has brought forth. And the day has finally arrived. The churning yeast has stopped…

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Historical Brews The American Lager Part 2

The Saga Continues… So when we last left the story of the American Lager. It was the mid-1800’s. The German population was exploding and with it, interest in a new style of beer. The Americanized version of a German lager was light, crisp, highly drinkable and so flavorless that people assumed it was  non-alcoholic. Seriously, there were questions at the time about whether or not American lagers were actually intoxicating. In upstate New York in…

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